Monday, January 1, 2018

Ravensburg: Messin' with Maps

I've tinkered a lot with broader contextual maps for the wider world surrounding Ravensburg. Here's my latest attempt, and the one I'm happiest with so far.

The World of Ravensburg -- latest iteration.

This map was inspired by an ancient world map attributed to Anaximander (610-546 B.C.): 

Map Reconstruction by: Bibi Saint-Pol, on Wikipedia.

5 comments:

  1. One thing those circular maps have in common is they reflect a cultural bias as to what lies in the center of the map. For example the above example put Greece near the center. Later medieval maps put Jerusalem at the center.

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    1. Oh, absolutely, you're right. The historical ones totally have a built-in bias. This one, however, unlike the historical ones, is accurate. The fictional world I'm envisioning truly is a flat disk. So things are where they really are. If PCs head too far out along the outer sea, they literally will fall off the edge (though whether they fall into airless space or into some other plane of existence is as yet unknown). Of course, the great question is, if someone were to dig straight down, or find a set of natural tunnels going straight down, where would the PCs eventually come out? Perhaps in an underworld? Or something resembling "the upside down"? Perhaps simply in another "normal" world? That I haven't yet really considered this question too much.

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  2. But otherwise the map looks good.

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    1. Thanks! Considering the high quality of your maps, that means a lot!

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  3. Just saw these Chris, these look very cool. And if maps have a cultural bias would that mean Amazon would be in the center today?

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